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Methodological confirmation bias

Inadequate appreciation of the extreme weakness of the test to which a substantive theory T is subjected by merely pre­dicting a directional statistical difference d > 0 is then compounded by a truly remarkable failure to recognize the logical asymmetry between, on the one hand, (formally invalid) “confirmation” of a theory via affirming the consequent in an argument of form: [T ⊃ H1, H1, infer T], and on the other hand the deductively tight refutation of the theory modus tollens by a falsified prediction, the logical form being: [T ⊃ H1, ~H1, infer ~T].

While my own philosophical predilections are somewhat Popperian, I daresay any reader will agree that no full-fledged Popperian philosophy of science is presupposed in what I have just said. The destruction of a theory modus tollens is, after all, a matter of deductive logic; whereas that the “confirmation” of a theory by its making successful predictions involves a much weaker kind of inference. This much would be conceded by even the most anti-Popperian “inductivist.” The writing of behavior scientists often reads as though they assumed—what it is hard to believe anyone would ex­plicitly assert if challenged—that successful and unsuccessful predictions are practically on all fours in arguing for and against a substantive theory. [112]

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